Archive for the 'Prescription Drugs' Category

10
Jun
10

You can overcome

The professor of my substance abuse class had a missionary couple talk to us today about the LDS Addiction Recovery Program.  It is very much like Alcoholics Anonymous but with an obvious Mormon faith spin on it.  The meetings are begun by reading aloud the twelve steps that are adapted from the AA program.  Other readings from the handbook are recited, and then a facilitator (one who is sober/clean for at least 6 months) kicks off the sharing portion of the meeting.  Sharing goes from person to person around the room, but you can say “pass” if you don’t want to participate.

Unlike AA, the Recovery Program offers a wide variety of meetings for various addictions, including illicit drugs, pornography, alcohol, prescription drugs, eating disorders, and more.  The meetings often take place in seminary and institute buildings, but they have several in the jails and prisons.  The sister missionary said the latter were her favorite places because it was there that she came to know that “Heavenly Father loves ALL His children.”  She continued to testify about the Savior and His atoning sacrifice and our need to utilize the Atonement EVERY SINGLE DAY.

I’m so grateful that Jesus Christ has made it possible for us to conquer our problems and addictions.  We would not have the power to do so were it not for Him.

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08
Jun
10

More Vicodin please

Read this quick article for some background information.

Utah is one of the leading states for prescription drug abuse.  Any guesses why?  I have an idea.  Utah is heavily populated by those of the LDS faith, which, as many of you know, does not condone the use of alcohol, tobacco, or illicit drugs.  For many of the people that do use these substances, they often use them as an escape, to relieve their pain and sorrows.  So instead of turning to these kinds of drugs to deal with life’s problems, the LDS Utahns are turning to accepted prescription drugs.

Unfortunately, I don’t think enough people understand how addicting these medications can be.  Just because the doctor prescribed them doesn’t mean they can do no harm.  People should only use as much as they need and then dispose of the remaining drugs properly.  Everyone always thinks, “Oh, but I might need them later,” however, hoarding such powerful medicine is dangerous, especially if there are teens or younger children in the home.

If you’re really interested in Utah’s prescription drug abuse problem, you should watch the movie Happy Valley.